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Cybercrime Groups Are Exploiting a Weakness in Gas Station POS Networks to Steal Credit Card Data Alerts Visa

Cybercrime Groups Are Exploiting a Weakness in Gas Station POS Networks to Steal Credit Card Data Alerts Visa
filling the car with gasoline refuel at gasstation

Cybercrime groups are actively taking advantage of a weakness in gas station point-of-sale networks to steal credit card information, Visa has revealed. The company’s fraud disruption groups are investigating a number of incidents by which a hacking group, generally known as Fin8, defrauded gas dispenser merchants. In every case, the attackers gained entry to the POS networks by way of malicious emails and different unknown means. They then put in POS scraping software that exploited the shortage of security with old-school mag stripe cards that lack a chip.

The hack does not seem to have an effect on safer chip cards; however, not all customers have those, so service stations usually work with mag stripe readers, too. The information is seemingly sent in an unencrypted form to the vendor’s major network, where the thieves have found out the way to intercept it. The opposite problem is that the POS methods aren’t firewalled off from different, much less important components of the network, permitting thieves to gain lateral access as soon as the network is breached. There are not a lot of cardholders that can do to avoid the assaults; however, Visa has suggested gas merchants encrypt information while it is transferred or use a chip-and-PIN policy.

Earlier this year, Visa announced that gas merchants should deploy chip readers by the month of October 2020. After that, any of the service stations without the new tech will probably be responsible for any fraud. The issue is, many such businesses have very previous technology and should exchange the whole pump at an approximate cost of up to $250,000 per station. Spread across all of the convenience shops within the US, the total hit has been estimated at around $22.5 billion.